Medical Equipment Repairers

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About the Job

Test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.

It is also Called

  • Biomedical Electronics Technician
  • Biomedical Engineering Technician (BMET)
  • Biomedical Equipment Specialist
  • Biomedical Equipment Support Specialist
  • Biomedical Equipment Technician (BMET)
  • Bio Medical Technician
  • Biomed Tech (Biomedical Technician)
  • Certified Biomedical Engineering Technician (CBET)
  • Certified Biomedical Equipment Technician (CBET)
  • Coil Repair Technician
View All

What They Do

  • Inspect and test malfunctioning medical or related equipment, following manufacturers' specifications and using test and analysis instruments.
  • Test or calibrate components or equipment, following manufacturers' manuals and troubleshooting techniques, using hand tools, power tools, or measuring devices.
  • Keep records of maintenance, repair, and required updates of equipment.
  • Perform preventive maintenance or service, such as cleaning, lubricating, or adjusting equipment.
  • Test, evaluate, and classify excess or in-use medical equipment and determine serviceability, condition, and disposition, in accordance with regulations.
  • Examine medical equipment or facility's structural environment and check for proper use of equipment to protect patients and staff from electrical or mechanical hazards and to ensure compliance with safety regulations.
  • Disassemble malfunctioning equipment and remove, repair, or replace defective parts, such as motors, clutches, or transformers.
  • Plan and carry out work assignments, using blueprints, schematic drawings, technical manuals, wiring diagrams, or liquid or air flow sheets, following prescribed regulations, directives, or other instructions as required.
  • Solder loose connections, using soldering iron.
  • Research catalogs or repair part lists to locate sources for repair parts, requisitioning parts and recording their receipt.

Interests

People who work in this occupation generally have the interest code: RIC.

This means people who work in this occupation generally have Realistic interests, but also prefer Investigative and Conventional environments.

Work Values

People who work in this occupation generally prize Support, but also value Relationships and Independence in their jobs.

Things They Need to Know

  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.

Things They Need to Be Able to Do

  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Education Required

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.

Wages

In 2016, the average annual wage in Kansas City, MO-KS was $47,460 with most people making between $29,590 and $64,010

Outlook

3.56%
avg. annual growth

During 2014, this occupation employed approximately 309 people in Kansas City, MO-KS. It is projected that there will be - employed in 2024.

This occupation will have about 11 openings due to growth and about 55 replacement openings for approximately 66 total annual openings.



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